THE BEATITUDES: PORTRAIT OF THE MASTER

PART 8: BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAKERS

 

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God” (Matthew 5:9).

 

The concept of peace in the Bible is much broader than simply the absence of war. It is a state of being and a way of living defined by wholeness and harmony with the world rooted in fidelity to God: “If you live in accordance with my precepts and are careful to observe my commandments, I will give you rain in due season, so that the land will bear its crops, and the trees their fruit; your threshing will last till vintage time, and your vintage till the time for sowing, and you will have food in abundance, so that you may dwell securely in your land. I will establish peace in the land, so that you may lie down to rest without anxiety. I will rid the country of ravenous beasts, and keep the sword of war from sweeping across your land…I will look with favor upon you, and make you fruitful and numerous, as I carry out my covenant with you” (Leviticus 26:3-6, 9).

 

This broader sense of peace and wholeness was God’s plan for his people from the beginning, but the people were not faithful, breaking peace with God. So God allowed them to be conquered by foreign powers and exiled from their land. His plans for them were not finished however, and through Isaiah he prophesied a new era of peace through a new, faithful king: “The people who walked in darkness have a seen a great light; upon those who dwelt in the land of gloom a light has shown…For a child is born to us, a son is given us; upon his shoulder dominion rests. They name him Wonder-Counselor, God-Hero, Father- Forever, Prince of Peace. His dominion is vast and forever peaceful, from David’s throne, and over his kingdom, which he confirms and sustains by judgment and justice both now and forever” (Isaiah 9:1, 5-6).

 

Jesus is the long-awaited savior prophesied by Isaiah (Matthew 4:13-16) who came to make peace between God and his people: “For in him the fullness was pleased to dwell, and through him to reconcile all things for him, making peace by the blood of his cross, whether those on earth or in heaven. And you who once were alienated and hostile in mind because of evil deeds he has now reconciled in his fleshly body through his death, to present you holy and without blemish, and irreproachable before him” (Colossians 1:19-23). By doing so, he also makes peace among the people who have made peace with God in Jesus: “But now in Christ you who once were far off have become near by the blood of Christ. For he is our peace, he who made both one and broke down the dividing wall of enmity, through his flesh…that he might create in himself one new person in place of the two, thus establishing peace, and might reconcile both with God, in one body, through the cross, putting that enmity to death by it. He came and preached peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near, for through him we both have access in one Spirit to the Father” (Ephesians 2:13-18).

 

 

This is the peace that Christ calls his disciples to make, to make peace with God and peace with one another in Christ. By doing so, we continue Christ’s saving, reconciling mission. That is why peacemakers will be called children of God, because we will be united with the Son of God in doing the Father’s will, preaching peace near and far and working for the day when all will be one in him (John 17:20-23).


Fr. Marc Stockton


 

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Outside of hurricane season, people looking for news coverage about anything except politics these days have pretty much adopted a lost cause.  The Democrats, the Republicans, and the president chase each other around in a circle, like a Tom and Jerry cartoon, only it isn’t funny.  Hours of television and radio shows, reams of newspapers and magazines, and countless blogs and websites bombard us daily with endless sound bites and analysis.  This side says this, this side says that.  This politician promises this, this politician promises that.  And so it goes, the politico’s waging a war of words for the heart of our nation, and here we are in the middle of it all asking ourselves, who really speaks for the people?  Who, if anyone, can claim that authority?

 

I will not even attempt to answer that, but I offer this example because our gospel reading raises a similar question.  In a world of many different, often competing, religions, who really speaks for God?  Who, if anyone, has that authority?  If our gospel reading is true, WE do, not by nature or by our own merits, but as an amazing gift and grave responsibility.

 

            Initially, today’s gospel seems rather superficial.  The first half reads like a student handbook, laying out a simple plan for discipline in the early Church.  But the second half digs deeper. Discipline requires authority.  All authority throughout the Scriptures ultimately comes from God, from the very beginning, when he disciplines Adam and Eve, through the Old Testament, as he repeatedly chastises his faithless People, right up to Christ himself, who, though completely free of sin, obeys the Father’s will and bears “the chastisement of us all” by becoming flesh and dying on the cross.  All authority in heaven and on earth comes from God. 

But, because of his obedient self-sacrifice, the Father gives all authority in heaven and on earth to his Son.  And, in today’s gospel, Jesus gives this authority to the community of disciples, the Church.

 

            Jesus gives the Church the authority to bind and loose, in this world and the next.  But that isn’t all.  He promises us that whenever the community agrees about ANYTHING for which we are to pray, it will be granted to us by our Father.  Jesus gives us the authority of God, all power in heaven and on earth, and he guarantees this promise by his continued presence with us through all time.  “Where two or three are gathered in my name, there am I in the midst of them,” he tells us, and he means it.

 

            Some of us may doubt this promise.  We can all probably think of an example of when we prayed desperately for something, and it didn’t happen.  We started prayer chains, offered Mass intentions, lit votive candles, prayed rosary after rosary on our knees, pleading with God, but still did not get what we wanted.  And maybe, for a while, we gave up on God. But remember Jesus’ words, “Where two or three are gathered IN MY NAME.”  Only when we gather in HIS NAME do we exercise his authority, and to gather in his name and exercise his authority means surrendering to the Father’s will, not trying to bend the Father to ours.

 

 

 

Think of the night before Jesus died.  He, too, questioned the Father.  Jesus struggled to see how the cross could accomplish God’s plan.  “Father, let this cup pass from me,” he begged, so intensely that he sweat blood.  But he continued, “Not my will; YOUR will be done.”  He surrendered himself completely to the Father’s will, and, through the defeat of the cross, triumphed over death.

 

Christ IS with us, always, even to the end of the age, but only if WE are with HIM, doing the Father’s will, do we share his authority.  Few people are called to do this through actual martyrdom, but we are all called to do this through obedient self-sacrifice.  Think of another image from the night before Christ died, before he went to the garden.  He reclined with his disciples at table, and, during the meal, he got up, wrapped a towel around his waist, and washed his disciples’ feet.  When he had finished, he said to them, “You call me teacher and master, and rightly so, for indeed I am.  If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet.  I have given you a model to follow, so that as I have done for you, you should also do.”  Obedient self-sacrifice through loving service of others.  That is the will of the Father for us; that is how we exercise the authority of God, an authority of, and for, service.

 

            Who speaks for God?  Who has that authority?  WE do.  All power in heaven and on earth has been given to us by Christ.  May we exercise it generously by obediently surrendering to God’s will and sacrificing ourselves in loving service of others.